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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 181 (some duplicates have been removed)
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against livle wages d woing conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was se
believes that we have to both walk and chew gum at the same time. we have to deal with our own economy and our fiscal situation. that is a given, because that is the source of our strength and our capacity. but we also have to be smart about making the right investments in diplomacy and development to try to solve problems and prevent them. >> i'm joined tonight with senator chris murphy of connecticut, who is a member of the senate foreign relations committee. senator, good to have you with us tonight. moving forward, security obviously is an issue. so getting funding and help from republicans shouldn't be hard after this hearing. that's what i see today. your thoughts on it. >> well, listen, the republicans have had chance after chance to do the right thing here. the irony is just as thick as the walls of the united states congress, when you think that they stripped $300 million out of the secretary's security requests before benghazi. but it gets even worse, ed. after benghazi, the president and the secretary of state said listen, we've got to do better. so they put before congress
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korea will have long-rangl the other things happening with the economy, with china. >> you wanted him to talk about that kind of stuff and he didn't. >> none of it was about that. and the american people -- we deserve some explanations here. yesterday, with secretary clinton: why have you not got an anybody who dead the benghazi attacks? we now know the same people are right out in the open admitting they did it. they're in algeria. we just had a warning today there's potentially another attack coming against westerners in benghazi. the second question, why did you fail to secure could -- gadhafi good's weapons before toppling him. those are the weapons we're seal all over the place, and the third thing i'd like to get some answers for, how are you going to protect all those american civilians who are staying behind after american troops leave the region. >> a good thing you weren't asking questions. we give a lot of money to this region. what are we getting for it? >> very little. that's one over the big problems with foreign aid. i like and believe in foreign aid. i think it's a lo
with their best strategy and the outcome for both the market and the economy. don't go anywhere. more "money" coming up. ♪ twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares re, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. lori: all right. back to business in washington now republicans hold a big vote to whether or not to extend the debt limit until may. if congress doesn't pass a budget by april 15th they no longer get paid! i have no problem with that. our panel is here with their take on the strategy. we have our favorite economist, peter morici. the always amazing scott martin, chief market strategist with united advisors and former democratic congressman
in 2014. the moves do follow heavy pressure from shinzo abe despite reflation and a flagging economy. but the yen actually settled higher with some economists. look at that. that is suggesting they ended up almost 1.2% above the dollar. there's questions whether the 2% dollar stated can be achieved. now there's plenty more on the boj's inflation packed with the government live. hi. >> hi, kelly. the bank of japan and the government issued a joint statement that set a 2% inflation target today replacing its current 1% price. from japan's monetary policy has shifted into unexplored territory. the boj agreed to try and hit the 2% target as quickly as possible rather than over the medium to long-term. but the target will probably be difficult to meet. forecasts released by the bank showed that the consumer price index will rise to just 0.9% in the fiscal year starting in 2014. boj officials said that the 2% target will be possible if the country's growth potential is improved by further government reform. the joint statement is binding for both the government and the boj calling on both
the american, the japanese and american economy. there is going to be hell to pay and it's going to happen soon. >> you're holding your news and buying. >> neil henessey, can we get back to all-time highs for the dow and the s&p. >> oh, michelle, i think easily. if you look at the dow jones right now, the price-to-sales ratio is 1.28. the most it will go up to is 1.5 so that leaves 17% on the upside or if hundred points. more importantly you look at the s&p 500 companies, they are sitting on 1.5 trillion in cash, 1.5 trillion -- >> hold on. you think 2,300 points in the dow? what are you talking about? >> very much so. >> i mean. you're talking about the high in 2007, michelle, was when the price-to-sales ratio of the dow jones was at 1.8. we're 40% away from that number, but, i mean, the companies are in great shape. there's so much cash sitting on the sidelines, and at some point in time the investors are going to get out of fix the income and move over towards equity. >> can i ask you a question and i'm very much concerned about this. what happens when the bond bubble bursts and those invest
of the ongoing drought is having on the u.s. economy and food prices. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> one of the key themes, of course, for any exhibition on the civil wars are the abolition and e mans nation. we are fortunate that they came of age what they did. between the two of them, they make issues around e mans passion and abolition. issues around human rights and american freedom on a general nonrace specific level. ly go through every piece of include that johnson puts in the picture. i'll summarize by saying for you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half. what you get is a white cat in the bedroom window and dark skin black woman holding a child. there's a ladder and a fabric coming out the other. there's a way in and out without being seen. there's a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the hen is on top of the slave quarters. if you add up of the little ins and outs and look down here at the white girl enteri
areas of agreement between myself, i am a conservative, and don. we both agreed that this economy will do well because of energy. we both believe it is on the upswing because of housing. >> that is all you have to say? stuart: we also agree on taxes. >> we should have a free enterprise, free market system. stuart: why are you such a supporter of the most leftist president in american history? >> it is not just a chief financial officer, it is a leader of our nation. he has no peers when it comes to any other candidate on the republican side or any other republican sitting in the senate. we are out of time. connell: good morning, everyone. i am connell mcshane. dagen: i am dagen mcdowell. things are looking up on the jobs front. connell: monica crowley. dagen: dreamliner, the troubles have not gone away for boeing. michael dell has ordered one of them. connell: then there is jamie dimon and john chambers. you will be hearing from both of them in this hour. liz claman at the world economic forum. cheryl: stocks now and every 15 minutes. apple. nicole: i will show you apple in a mome
to note with after almost four years having passed with an economy that's been struggling, the senate never acted. it took one week in which their paychecks were on the line that now the senate is going to step up and do the right thing. we welcome them to this debate around the budget of the nation and look forward to making sure we can begin to reduce the mountain of debt that is facing our children. >> when you go across the country and talk to individuals, they're always stunned. it has been four years since the senate did a budget. when they stood back and looked the last time they did a budget, the ipad wasn't introduced or chevy volt and no instagram. it's shocking. today, you found a bipartisan vote that is asking for accountability and effectiveness in government and that's why we are moving it and we welcome the opportunity that the senate joins the debate and actually brings accountability back. >> today, the house acted. the house acted to put washington on a budget and to force a conversation about how we spend money. everyone in america understands that budgets matter. a
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
to not be part of that, because it is terrible for the economy and seems to be bad politics. host: white house press secretary jay carney. let's hear purcellville in broken arrow, oklahoma, republican. what is your advice to republicans for the second obama administration? caller: i love c-span and i am so glad that you have this live call-in talk show from individuals all over the world. my question is, to the republicans, i know that you heard in the inaugural speech to the word "to gather." we have to come together. together we stand as we the people. i know and hope that our president of the united states, president obama, is hearing our voices this morning being back in the white house for and other four years. i am a military mom. i want to say this to the republicans. please work with our president of the united states. he is the general in chief for all of us. is gettingely on who more. we can ask. we can write letters. we can twitter and all the settings. but we have to come together. he is the one we voted for. as we let's work together the people. that is my answer to the republican
growth will reach 3.5% this year. that's up from 3.2% in 2012. the imf says the euro zone economy will recover more slowly than previously expected. the imf's growth forecast for the united states is 2%. that's as long as the country contains its fiscal crisis including the debt ceiling and fiscal growth. the imf has mained growth outlook for the japanese economy for 1.2% this year. they were warned about the risks of accumulating debt without consolidation measures. >> when the countries start with ray otio of debt to gdp, in bot cases it's much above. we vowed a clear plan for fiscal consolidation over the next five, ten years, it seems to many to be quite dangerous to increase the fiscal deficit. >> the u.s. house of representatives have agreed to raise the debt ceiling until may 18th. the bill will prevent the government from defaulting on its debt. the bill passed the house on wednesday ter t republican majority changed its stance. republicans said they would not approve the bill unless the government made more cuts to social programs. republicans had public criticism that th
) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> she grew emotional, got angry, but in two congressional hearings this week, the secretary of state hillary clinton stood her ground about the attack in libya which took the lives of four americans, including the u.s. ambassador,
state in this world economy forum report that we can prevent storms like sandy if we pay $700 billion a year now. this -- this is amazing. for actual people who phds to come up with these reports, but they do it. they are. lying somehow acts of government and spending can somehow control our government to the climate we want. he said we could do something about floods and hurricanes and droughts, now the power of the ballot box extends to controlling the weather. neil: do you feel this speaks to urgency of doing something about this, what do you think? >> if you accept the united nations and al gore's view, doing, whatever they propose, would have no impact according to their figures. so it is an exercise in futility even if you believe it. the kyoto protocol. the grand-daddy of all climate treaties, which canada has just pulled out of. if that were fully ratified and enforced, it would not have a impact on global warming according to global warming activists figures, the same with u.s., cap and trade bill, obama saying it would have made our planet 4 to 5 degrees cooler. meanwhile ep
for the economy. it is not good for our children. its sad we have to have a gimmick like this. some members are a quite wealthy, there are a few of them, won't care. but a good many members after month or two their spouses will say to them, what are you doing you knucklehead. they have to have a solution. melissa: this is another time the american public looks at it, wow, feels like you put off the work that you need to do. we said we will raise the debt ceiling for a couple months and, you know, there you go. we haven't gotten any of the real work done? >> it was a short-term punt but i think it was pretty shrewd move by the republicans because you can't default on our debt. if interest rates went up even slightly the amount of interest we would have to pay on our $16 trillion debt would be enormous. you can't do that. it would be shooting ourself in the foot. they tried closing down the government back in the 1990s. that didn't didn't work too well. they're focusing on what is called the sequester, which are across the board spending reductions. that's where i think they will make their s
great economies throughout the world trying to continue colonialism or imperialism or whatever you want to call it. zogby to pull back, take care of the u.s. -- we need to pull back. we are shortchanging the u.s. host: this is more from yesterday, secretary clinton giving her assessment. [video clip] >> we live in a dangerous and incredibly complicated world now with very different forces at work. state-based and non-state. technology and communication. i am older than the president. i don't want to surprise anybody by saying that. >> not by much. >> i remember some of the speeches of eisenhower as a young girl. you have got to be careful. you have to be thoughtful. you cannot rush in especially now where it's more complex than it has been in decades. so, yes, there are wicked problems like syria, absolutely. we are on the side of american values, freedom, the aspirations of all people to have a better life, to have the opportunity we are fortunate to have here. but it's not always easy proceed exactly what must be done in order to get to that outcome. so i certainly am grateful for the
to have more control over our economy, more taxes, more regulations, more spending. there's a fundamental difference between the president's view of our future and reality and so when the president gives an inaugural address and doesn't address the national debt that's how difficult it is to get anything done. >> greta: what is the reasonable expectation for the american people is going to happen. i mean, knowing the president and knowing that he's in power and knowing that democrats are here in power in the senate and republicans in the house and all the people, all the different interests. what's going to happen? >> i think, look, we're going to have to win some elections and get people up here in both chambers that are going to take this issue seriously. >> greta: and all parties. >> i think in our party-- everybody knows it's inevitable. the time will come when we have to deal with the issues and the sooner we deal with it, the better off we'll be. if we deal with them now we deal with them on terms. the longer we wait to save medicare, the more disruptive it's going to be, the more c
and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all around the world. the weakened cash in on that. would not have to wait on it. -- we can cash in on that. we do not have to wait on it. we need to keep doing what we're doing. it is going to mean a tremendous amount of jobs. we have seen that all through the midwest. north dakota is certainly a huge example of it. they say now there is to% and unemployed -- 2% unemployed there. we cannot find those folks. [laughter] we're s
horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. zwroo well, today is election day in jordan, and there are a couple of noteworthy things about the voting there today. yes, jordan is a kingdom, but people do get to pick some of the parliament. for the first time ever international observers were allowed to be watched over the vote looking for signs of glitches and intimidation. so far they report everything running smoothly. jordan remains pretty stable in a region turned upside down by the arab spring. this is a major point, too. jordan is friendly to israel. it's not without its problems though. that does bring us to israel. election time there as well. voters across israel choosing to keep prime minister benjamin netanyahu on the job. only his coalition kept enough seats to just stay in power. lost seats though, many of them to religious parties to the far right and to a new party with a surprising popularity. here's cnn's atika shubert. >> reporter: who is j.r.lapite. after tuesday's election, he is also the newes
nonpartisan testimony that when the debt is this large in comparison to the economy, it costs the country the equivalent of about one million jobs. think about that. if washington got its debt and spending under control, one million more americans will be working today. and if that wasn't sobering enough, fitch ratings recently warned that the failure to come up with a plan for reducing our debt would likely still result in a downgrade of the u.s. credit rating. a lower credit rating is sure to mean higher interest rate. that meansigher credit card rates, higher student loans, certainly higher mortgage payments. despite these warnings, the democrat-controlled senate hasn'troduced a budget in 1,300 days, four years without a budget. how can we begin to get our debt under control when democrats won't even produce a budget this bill is the first step in forcing democrats to put forward a budget so we can start holding washington accountable for its out of control spending. every day, american families have to make decisions abtheir household finances. they have to adjust their spending to co
to the reconstruction of the south economic he and the revitalization of the content economy, which all of america relied on. the industrialization of many parts of the south. all of these things continued into the 20th century up to the dawn of world war ii. we do not know how many african americans found themselves back in a world of being bought and sold, but there is more evidence about this existing than many historians realize are wanted to confront. hundreds of thousands of people were bought and sold. thousands and thousands of african-american men and some african-american women died under horrifying circumstances. this was a system that relied on fatality and starvation and intimidation and a more fertile kind of involuntary servitude than what preceded it. it became a weapon of terror and intimidation to force african- americans from exercising their civil rights and intimidating them into compliance with the other kinds of explicative liver that we know more about. the repercussions of all of that are still with us. the legacy of that economically and educationally is very much somethi
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
or not to stay in the european union, britain one of the e.u.'s largest economy, the most important financial center, and, oh, yes, the pound sterling at odds with the euro. markets up more than 4% year to date. my next guest says while some investors are still on the sidelines, we're beginning to see a little bit more interest. joining us now with his outlook for the markets and the economy, of course, chief investment strategist for ubs wealth management, mike ryan. mike, good to have you here. >> good to be here. lou: a lot of fun in the european union. start there. we're not hearing so much about the collapse of the e.u., david cameron has other ideas, but the reality seems to be that things are quieting down a bit over there and not influencing our markets nearly so much. >> i think that's fair. i think what we're seeing, really, in the eurozone is an absence of mall las. the last couple years, an existential crisis, would the euro and player survive? a lot has been taken off the table by the posture of the european central bank saying we're standing behind the sovereigns. where does the
and the germans do that, they do it right. but with some failing economies are weak economies that heavily depend on exports, heavily dependent on the car industry. david notes that can go up and down. and so, two things. i don't think they have the political will to engage much outside the borders. and i don't think they have the financial resources to do is manage as we think they should do and maybe even some policy people think they should do relative to their military strength. if salaries were just not in a position to do that now there's been a heavy reliance on u.s. president says that diminishes the tough decisions to make as are other nations. yes, ma'am, her. >> of learning. barbara mathews of bcm analytical as. i've got a question about the 21st century with large. you have described what sounds like you consider to be as inevitable retrenchment if not a potential return to some isolationists in the united states whether for political reasons or budgetary constraint purposes. that is a very different position than america as a guarantor of security and liberty locally. europe may not
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
economy, is social justice. not trying to manipulate a society, not trying to move toward a collectivist society. so there are fairly radical -- radically different visions of what creates social justice, what creates that opportunity. i think we as the conservatives, as those who are defenders of freedom, have to constantly be pushing. even when we're running against that brick wall we've got to keep running into it until eventually we knock parts of it down because heaven forbid if this president were to get his vision of the agenda, what would this country look like four years from now? >> talk a little bit more about the tax component of the republican agenda. when you talk about tax reform what does that mean? >> one of the thing that -- things that has some of us enthused, chairman camp, at least this is what i'm hear they spent two years holding hearings, collecting information about what a much broader base, lower rate, a lot less, you know, sorry to throw some acquaintances under the bus, lobbyist created carveouts, special extenders in the tax code would look leek and why do we
change and those solutions will both help keep our families safe and help our economy grow at the same time. >> okay. there you have it. what do you say to that? >> i say you look at the literature. we know a study in journal of nature show 60 years no trend in droughts and there was a decline in the u.s. except for the most recent one in 2012 which wasn't even as big as one in the 1950s or 1930s. in terms of flood, 80 to 117 years, no trend in floods. hurricanes, eight years now with the longest period without a major landfalling category 3 or larger hurricane in that eight years since 1900 we've gone that long. if you start looking at these measures -- >> answer me this point. you wouldn't dispute there's been increased acceleration in c02, right? >> james hanson from nasa indicated flat lining temperatures. the movements have shifted to extreme storms. that's the focus. evidence is everywhere when you look at extremes. bottom line is we always had extreme weather. in the 1970s, the cia report and "newsweek" and people worried about coming ice age blamed extreme weather. droughts and
and a stable economy as a means to security and stability. i think the concerns are many. the concerns are around africa com in 2008 at a time when africa surpassed the middle east in its supply of oil to the united states and the concern of the u.s. of africa and oil and a vital resource is the true rationale for africacom, as well as countering china in that theater where china is increasing its influence. the concern was heightened before africacom was heightened. concern has grown over time. is there any effort to evaluate africacom? i understand your stepping down as a new commander steps in. there has been a congressional hearing on benghazi, but clearly there is a bigger issue at stake and that is u.s. foreign-policy with regards to africa. thank you. >> thank you. it will not surprise you that i disagree with most of what you said, which is ok here k. we live in a country where you can do that. it is true that the state department has the authority for security assistance matters. some of that 8-9,000,000,000 dollars that is spent in africa does in fact go to security assistanc
% of the entire budget of the government. at a time when the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world's comment we face a more global markets at any time in our history. not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders and in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i've been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy and a dangerous world. i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work closely with this committee. not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively without your involvement and your ideas going forward. thank you, mr. chairman and members of the committee. i know there is a lot of ground to cover. >> [inaudible] [indiscernible] >> when i first came to washington and testified,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 181 (some duplicates have been removed)

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